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Making a positive difference

VARIATION in work, the unpredictability of it all and the ability to help people and make a difference is why Leading Senior Constable Rohan Michael dons his Victoria Police uniform every day. 

Every shift brings new challenges, making each day unique and jobs diverse.

“You respond to the phone or whoever walks through the door. You never know what might come up – you could have car accidents or domestic disputes, through to proactive activities, such as station tours with school groups,” Leading S/C Michael said.

Joining Victorian Police in 2005, he sought out a long term career change from work as an arborist.

Initially posted in Reservoir, Leading S/C Michael then completed stints at Bairnsdale and Wonthaggi stations before shifting to Leongatha station nine years ago. 

When asked how the urban station compared to rural policing, Leading S/C Michael said that without question, the city was much busier, but they generally had the resources to go with the higher workload.

“The lifestyle here is an obvious attraction that goes with the job. In the country, you very quickly become a part of the community,” he said.

“People know who you are and what you do, which is largely positive.”

However, while it may be quieter in the countryside, policing still has its challenges.

According to Leading S/C Michael, regional police stations often lack access to the resources otherwise available in the city.

“We are often working without a lot of backup here, which teaches you to be resourceful,” he said.

“You need to have excellent communication skills – as you don’t always have that backup support, and you have to be mindful of this when attending jobs.”

Proficient communications skills are just one component to being a successful police officer.

“For someone wanting to apply, life experience and life skills, like travelling, having varied work experience and all those day to day experiences that build up skills are important. Being resilient, compassionate and community minded are essential,” Leading S/C Michael said.

“A common job might be attending a domestic dispute, so you need to have enough life experience to assist those people and help them with a challenging time in their life.”

As a result, individuals often make the career change into policing later in life.

“I was 30 when I joined and being older has given me the confidence to back my judgement and make informed decisions,” he said.

Shift work is another positive aspect of the job, allowing for good family and life balance.

“You have to be able to cope with shift work and nights, but I’ve always found it to work in really well with family and my other commitments,” he said.

While the job can at times take a toll, Leading S/C Michael said overall it was a rewarding career that he wants to see out into retirement.

For more information about a career in policing and to check eligibility requirement, visit www.policecareer.vic.gov.au

Information sessions are also accessible to learn more about the roles and the recruitment process.

Short URL: http://thestar.com.au/?p=28413

Posted by on Apr 24 2019. Filed under Business. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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