|

Prices ease at Koony market

There were approximately 850 export and 200 young cattle penned, representing a decrease of 670 head week on week.
Reports suggest the reduction in numbers was in response to a decline in demand for prime cattle in recent weeks. The usual buying group was present but not operating fully in a cheaper market.
The young cattle were predominately yearling heifers,with those suited to the trade easing 4c to 6c/kg.
The offering of 300 steers and bullocks was 100 head fewer than the expected draw, however demand was weak for the limited run. The best drafts eased 6c, while the majority of the grown steers and bullocks fell 15c/kg.
Heavy weight Friesian and crossbred manufacturing steers slipped 9c to 12c/kg. Heavy weight grown heifers showing good finish sold 7c/kg cheaper.
Most weights and grades were represented in the 450 cows and prices declined 11c to 16c, while the heavy weight bulls slipped 6c to 9c/kg.
A small number of yearling steers to restock and feed sold from 150c to 160c/kg. Yearling heifers suited to the trade made between 155c and 179c, after a top of 189c/kg.
Grown steers sold between 175c and 190c/kg. Bullocks made from 169c to 189c/kg. Well finished heavy weight grown heifers sold from 155c to 176c, after a top of 190c/kg.
Heavy weight Friesian manufacturing steers made between 150c and 162c, with the crossbred portion between 158c and 183c/kg.
Most light and medium weight cows sold between 100c and 130c/kg, while heavy weight cows made mostly from 130c to 150c/kg.
Heavy weight C and B muscle bulls sold from 168c to 200c, while the D muscle dairy lines sold from 150c to 180c/kg.

Vendors: from left, Tara (6), Tina (4), Angelica and Danniel Hancock.  The Hancock’s 200 head of Friesians were up for auction at the VLE on Friday morning in a complete herd dispersal.  Circumstances change and Mr Hancock says, “I have no choice, they have to go.” He was hoping for a good result from the sale or as he said, “The prices go up as the grass grows.”

Vendors: from left, Tara (6), Tina (4), Angelica and Danniel Hancock.
The Hancock’s 200 head of Friesians were up for auction at the VLE on Friday morning in a complete herd dispersal.
Circumstances change and Mr Hancock says, “I have no choice, they have to go.”
He was hoping for a good result from the sale or as he said, “The prices go up as the grass grows.”

Short URL: http://thestar.com.au/?p=12597

Posted by on Oct 30 2014. Filed under Rural News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Recently Commented

  • gatha4: Thankyou to The Star for your interest in and support for Aaron and his family. Trista’s Kitchen is...
  • gigamax1: Truth is,most of these jobs will be taken by overseas labour,just like the other horticulture in this and...
  • gigamax1: These shops are just a bad investment,admittedly made no better by the bypass, but even if the bypass came...
  • vbresident: I applaud Cr. Jim Fawcett on his work-related ethics, which are reminiscent of past Councils. I can...
  • reality: After the board meeting where the Department of Health Secretary was again there to discuss some of the...