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Young voters use voice

YOUNG people and first time voters have strong views on the upcoming federal election.

Which way to go: first time voters at Leongatha Secondary College have mixed views about the upcoming election. They include, back, from left, Jake Burge, Logan Anderson, middle, Katherine Cardy, Molly Kuhne, Mariah Grant, Brittany Tennyenhuis and, front, Jake McMillan.

Which way to go: first time voters at Leongatha Secondary College have mixed views about the upcoming election. They include, back, from left, Jake Burge, Logan Anderson, middle, Katherine Cardy, Molly Kuhne, Mariah Grant, Brittany Tennyenhuis and, front, Jake McMillan.

Education, economy, asylum seekers and marriage equality are all high on the list of issues faced by young people.
First time voters from Leongatha Secondary College have mixed views about the upcoming election.
Some like Katherine Cardy believes marriage equality is the big issue while Jake Burge said funding for universities and education were big issues for him. Asylum seekers, climate change and job cuts were also issues for some students.
Logan Anderson can’t make up his mind.
“I don’t want to vote for either of the major parties,” he said.
“I think there should be a better way for them to outline what they are going to do and ways of making them stick to their word.”
The group was torn about whether they would vote or not if voting was not compulsory.
“If I didn’t get a fine I don’t think I would vote,” Brittany Tennyenhuis said.
“It’s hard when you don’t want to vote for either of the parties.”
Young people responded overwhelming to a call for comment from The Star via Facebook.
Despite the complex issue of federal economics, many young people would like to see the economy stabilised and an end to pointless spending.
Education funding is a major issue with some respondents saying they will vote for whoever promises not to cut money out of tertiary education sectors such as university and TAFE.
Others stated both major parties have a wrong stance on asylum seekers and demanded a more humanitarian approach.
On a two party preferred basis, some couldn’t look past Labor’s recent over spending, while others want to give their vote to whoever could outline clear and concise policies and a plan for the future.

Short URL: http://thestar.com.au/?p=8270

Posted by on Aug 27 2013. Filed under Featured, News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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