Gifts offer hope

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Gifts offer hope

CREATIONS from around the world were sold in Leongatha on Saturday to benefit people in developing countries.

Bright hopes: Barbara Smith of Mukti Australia, a charity helping woman and children in India, flies a scarf made in India with Leongatha siblings Charlotte and Phillip Smith. Barbara is formerly of Toora and now lives at Skye.

Bright hopes: Barbara Smith of Mukti Australia, a charity helping woman and children in India, flies a scarf made in India with Leongatha siblings Charlotte and Phillip Smith. Barbara is formerly of Toora and now lives at Skye.

International insight: Emily Chalmers of Leongatha considers a bag made in Peru at a stall run by Rosemary Abbey of Leongatha in aid of Ethica and TEAR Australia.

International insight: Emily Chalmers of Leongatha considers a bag made in Peru at a stall run by Rosemary Abbey of Leongatha in aid of Ethica and TEAR Australia.

Bags and wrist bands from Peru, scarves from India, jewellery from Thailand and goods from Africa were among the goods offered at the Fairer World Bazaar at the Leongatha Uniting Church.
The fair offered alternate gifts as well as stands with information about international aid projects, some such as Bryn’s School and Kongor Primary School in South Sudan, with connections to South Gippsland.
Bryn’s School builds schools for children in Asia and Africa, and is overseen by the Hendry family of Nyora, Korumburra and Cape Paterson.
Kongor School Support Group is helping to rebuild Kongwak Primary School in South Sudan. The group is based in Bass Coast and fronted by Felicia Di Stefano of Glen Forbes.
The bazaar was held as part of Anti-Poverty Week and staged by Make Poverty History and TEAR Australia.
Spokesperson Johanna Haasjes was delighted with the result, saying proceeds from each stall were returned to the countries where goods were produced.
“People are selling for projects they are passionate about and they are familiar with because they have been there,” she said.
“People want to be kind and want to help, and we are giving them the opportunity. The experience is a positive experience rather than making people feel guilty because sometimes people can be overwhelmed by what happens in other countries.”
Ms Haasjes said the event coincided with the Leongatha Rotary Art and Photography Show and also the Native Plant Show, and the three events drew many people to Leongatha.

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Posted by on Oct 22 2013. Filed under Community, Featured. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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